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Dennis Barton dropped off a schedule from Riverboat Daze in 1969. Judging by the number of events, plus all the advertisers, it was a pretty big deal!

Oddly enough, it was on a Sunday and a Monday, of what must have been the August long weekend. It started with a fly-in breakfast. That was followed by a parade, and then the scene shifted to the river for all sorts of races. Stock car races followed that and a water-skiing competition wrapped up that portion of the festivities. Fireworks were at 10 and a dance finished things off, starting at one minute after midnight!

Then on the Monday it was a baseball tournament, plus some competitive stuff on the beach (flour-packing, tug of war, swimming, bicycle racing, etc.).

A ‘Gigantic Wiener Roast’ followed. Whether this was the roasting of a gigantic wiener, or was just expected to be a really big event with lots of hungry people eating lots of regular-sized wieners is not specified in the schedule.

A teen dance was the final event of the busy two days.


We’re bound to complain about the weather, but as the first serious snowfall of 2021 arrived last week, parts of southern B.C. were in full-on disaster mode, with epic flooding, landslides, etc. Which just goes to show you – somebody else always has it worse. All the best to those folks as they dry up, dig out and try to get back as close to normal as they can.


Speaking of that big snowfall, it was probably part of the same weather system that dumped all the rain further south. On the whole, snow seems preferable to rain in November. Even a lot of it.


Stories of getting stuck in the snow and then unstuck were going around last week. One of our colleagues got bogged down in the snow in her apartment building parking lot. Somebody came to her rescue with a shingle (not making this up!) he happened to have in his vehicle. It provided enough traction to get her moving. There you go; you never know when a spare shingle is going to come in handy and save the day.

Somebody else was online thanking people for helping her get unstuck, which she said happened several times on the day after the night of the big snow. She might want to consider carrying around a shingle or two in her trunk!


RCMP Const. Giulia Dirisio is keen to promote Project Capture. It’s a program where owners of video surveillance cameras can offer footage to the police if crimes have happened in their area. It’s totally voluntary, but if the RCMP have a network of willing contributors, it can save them vital hours in tracking down evidence.

And – apparently this is an important point for some people – it’s not a live feed. The police can only see what you agree to provide them.


Things are changing in the plumbing and heating business, an old hand was telling us the other day. Suppliers expect you to order online and don’t want to take the time to talk to you on the phone.

Ordering online can often result in getting a part that isn’ t quite the right one.

All that, plus the service providers seem less willing than they used to be to go out of their way for their customers, he says.


The Dragonfly Centre is working toward offering a branch office in Slave Lake to provide support for survivors of sexual assault and the people who support them. Online counselling and other services are already available at https://thedragonflycentre.com.

Also, December 17th is the deadline to register for a free half-day training program about Enhanced Emergency Sexual Assault Services (EESAS). It is on Zoom on Monday, January 17th from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. to register email [email protected] with ‘EESAS training spot’ for a subject. For more information, call Eileen Hofman at 780-812-3174.


A big infusion of federal cash and – voila! We have daycare rates cut in half in Alberta (as of next year) and a promise of $10 per day daycare within two or three more years. Does this seem a bit extravagant?

We thought $25 per day for daycare was a very good deal. But it’s apparently not good enough for our free-spending federal government. Not that anybody who benefits is going to complain. But it will add to the already rising oceans of red ink emanating from Ottawa. Where that leads is anybody’s guess, but it can’t be good. Surely some kind of reckoning is inevitable. Or can we keep living on borrowed money forever?

Questions, questions, questions.

Perhaps it is too grinch-like to bring the daycare situation into this bigger question of deficit spending. It’s just one small part of it, that happens to be the latest example.

Dennis Barton dropped off a schedule from Riverboat Daze in 1969. Judging by the number of events, plus all the advertisers, it was a pretty big deal!

Oddly enough, it was on a Sunday and a Monday, of what must have been the August long weekend. It started with a fly-in breakfast. That was followed by a parade, and then the scene shifted to the river for all sorts of races. Stock car races followed that and a water-skiing competition wrapped up that portion of the festivities. Fireworks were at 10 and a dance finished things off, starting at one minute after midnight!

Then on the Monday it was a baseball tournament, plus some competitive stuff on the beach (flour-packing, tug of war, swimming, bicycle racing, etc.).

A ‘Gigantic Wiener Roast’ followed. Whether this was the roasting of a gigantic wiener, or was just expected to be a really big event with lots of hungry people eating lots of regular-sized wieners is not specified in the schedule.
A teen dance was the final event of the busy two days.


We’re bound to complain about the weather, but as the first serious snowfall of 2021 arrived last week, parts of southern B.C. were in full-on disaster mode, with epic flooding, landslides, etc. Which just goes to show you – somebody else always has it worse. All the best to those folks as they dry up, dig out and try to get back as close to normal as they can.


Speaking of that big snowfall, it was probably part of the same weather system that dumped all the rain further south. On the whole, snow seems preferable to rain in November. Even a lot of it.


Stories of getting stuck in the snow and then unstuck were going around last week. One of our colleagues got bogged down in the snow in her apartment building parking lot. Somebody came to her rescue with a shingle (not making this up!) he happened to have in his vehicle. It provided enough traction to get her moving. There you go; you never know when a spare shingle is going to come in handy and save the day.

Somebody else was online thanking people for helping her get unstuck, which she said happened several times on the day after the night of the big snow. She might want to consider carrying around a shingle or two in her trunk!


RCMP Const. Giulia Dirisio is keen to promote Project Capture. It’s a program where owners of video surveillance cameras can offer footage to the police if crimes have happened in their area. It’s totally voluntary, but if the RCMP have a network of willing contributors, it can save them vital hours in tracking down evidence.

And – apparently this is an important point for some people – it’s not a live feed. The police can only see what you agree to provide them.


Things are changing in the plumbing and heating business, an old hand was telling us the other day. Suppliers expect you to order online and don’t want to take the time to talk to you on the phone.

Ordering online can often result in getting a part that isn’ t quite the right one.

All that, plus the service providers seem less willing than they used to be to go out of their way for their customers, he says.


The Dragonfly Centre is working toward offering a branch office in Slave Lake to provide support for survivors of sexual assault and the people who support them. Online counselling and other services are already available at https://thedragonflycentre.com.

Also, December 17th is the deadline to register for a free half-day training program about Enhanced Emergency Sexual Assault Services (EESAS). It is on Zoom on Monday, January 17th from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. to register email [email protected] with ‘EESAS training spot’ for a subject. For more information, call Eileen Hofman at 780-812-3174.


A big infusion of federal cash and – voila! We have daycare rates cut in half in Alberta (as of next year) and a promise of $10 per day daycare within two or three more years. Does this seem a bit extravagant?

We thought $25 per day for daycare was a very good deal. But it’s apparently not good enough for our free-spending federal government. Not that anybody who benefits is going to complain. But it will add to the already rising oceans of red ink emanating from Ottawa. Where that leads is anybody’s guess, but it can’t be good. Surely some kind of reckoning is inevitable. Or can we keep living on borrowed money forever?

Questions, questions, questions.

Perhaps it is too grinch-like to bring the daycare situation into this bigger question of deficit spending. It’s just one small part of it, that happens to be the latest example.


Smurf hats on mountain ash berries – as seen previously on the Lakeside Leader’s FB group.

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