UBC archive opens, recognizing Larry Loyie, Constance Brissenden

Honours and recognitions keep coming for local authors Larry Loyie and Constance Brissenden. On April 9, Brissenden was at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver for the opening of the Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre.
Part of the centre includes the start of the digital introduction of the Loyie Brissenden Archives at the centre. The important centre represents British Columbia, Alberta, the Northwest Territories, and Yukon Territory survivors. At the centre, kiosks are available where visitors can put on headphones and listen to Loyie’s extended interview done professionally by the High Prairie Oral History Project in 2011. There are six computers for research available. Every Loyie book is featured with a cover, description, and library link.
Much more can be added, and will be. Brissenden says it is very exciting and wonderful to see Loyie honoured this way for decades to come.
“The university is grateful to receive our research, the first such major donation to its archives,” she says.
Copies of Residential Schools, With the Words and Images of Survivors and Two Plays About Residential School, are featured everywhere.


Constance Brissenden, centre, with UBC librarians Sarah Dumont, left, and Kim Lawson.

Share this post

Post Comment